Wading River Extension  

 


Terrain map of Wading River Extension

Bob Emery Maps of the Wading River Extension - 1925
provided
by: Dave Keller

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MP57-58 Port Jeff
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MP58-59
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MP59-60
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MP60-61
 Miller Place 
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MP61-62 
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MP62-63
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    MP63-64
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MP64-65 
Rocky Point
MP65-66wadingriverextEmery.jpg (158185 bytes)
MP65-66 
Shoreham
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MP66-67 
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MP67-68 
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MP68 Wading River

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Emery Composite Map of the Wading River Extension - 1925
by Steven Lynch 11/18/2006

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Google Earth of the ROW as it looks today, pieced together, highlighting the ROW route, and added the stations. Credit: Bob Andersen


A Brief History of the Wading River Extension
by
Dave Keller

The Wading River Extension headed east from Port Jefferson in 1895, built by the “LIRR Co. North Shore Branch,” a subsidiary of the LIRR. The stations were as follows, after leaving Port Jefferson: 

Miller's Place

MP60-61wadingriverextEmery.jpg (163405 bytes)  MP60-61 Emery Map 1925, Collection: Dave Keller

MILLER’S PLACE:  STATION STOP WITH OPENING OF BRANCH: 1895. APPEARS ON TIMETABLES WITH AND WITHOUT 
THE APOSTROPHE BUT NEVER AS " MILLER PLACE " AS THE TOWN LATER WAS NAMED. ORIGINALLY NO DEPOT BUILDING
STOP ONLY. 1st DEPOT BUILT: 1898, BURNED: 1902. 

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Eastbound D52 approaching the Depot, c. 1898
Collection: Dave Keller
Sta-MillersPlace1stDepot-HolidayHseGirls-1900.jpg (56080 bytes)
Holiday House Girls posing, c. 1900 – View looking northeast.  
The Holiday House was a local hotel. (T. Bayles-Keller)

MILLER’S PLACE:  2nd NEARLY IDENTICAL DEPOT BUILT: 1902. AGENCY CLOSED c. 1928. DEPOT BURNED: 10/1934 
(per Bob Emery). 
THEREAFTER PLATFORM ONLY. LAST REVENUE TRAIN: 10/9/38. OUT OF SVC. PER G.O. #1006C: 3/29/39 AND BRANCH ABANDONED

Per the Miller Place-Mt. Sinai Historical Society's website, Miller Place was originally a part of the Old Mans territory purchased in 1664 by the Town of Brookhaven which was in what is today Setauket. The name Miller Place derives from the first permanent settler in the area, Andrew Miller, and the name took hold sometime around 1700. In those days, roads did not have a name such as North Country Rd, but were referred to as the road from one location to another. In this instance the road was "From Town (Setauket) to Andrew Miller's Place."  Eventually the "Andrew" was dropped, and finally the possessive "s" was dropped in the early 1900s.  http://www.mpmshistoricalsociety.org/new_site/index.php?id=8

It was typical of the LIRR, as they did at other station locations, that they didn't follow suit immediately (or sometimes, like with Miller's Place . . . never) with the name change.  You can clearly see on the c. 1914 and 1915 images of the depot (as well as on timetables of the era), the station name sign reads "MILLER'S PLACE," quite a few years after the town dropped the possessive "s!"   (Dave Keller data)

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Awaiting train time.  View looking southeast  1910
Collection: Dave Keller

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Removing wooden trestle at Miller Place Rd.  
Summer 1939 View W (A. Bayles-Keller)

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Awaiting train time.  View looking east from express platform  1915
(T. Bayles-Keller)

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Millers Place 2nd Station - Train Time View E c.1914 
Archive: Dave Keller

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Removing wooden trestle at Miller Place Rd.  
Summer 1939 View NW (A. Bayles-Keller)
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Removing wooden trestle at Miller Place Rd.  
Summer 1939 View E (A. Bayles-Keller)

Rocky Point

ROCKY POINT: BUILT: 1895.  LAST REVENUE TRAIN: 10/9/38.  OUT OF SVC:  3/29/39 WITH 
BRANCH ABANDONMENT. IN USE AS PRIVATE BUSINESS.  STILL STANDING:
2003
MP64-65wadingriverextEmery.jpg (120941 bytes) MP64-65 Emery Map 1925, Collection: Dave Keller

Station - Rocky Point_1928.jpg (35795 bytes)Rocky Point depot 1928 View looking northeast. Archive: Dave Keller

Removing Stone Bridge-Hallock Ldg Rd-Rocky Point-1939_ (A. Bayles-Keller).jpg (55788 bytes)
Removing stone bridge at Hallock Lodge Rd. - 1939 
( A. Bayles-Keller
)

Shoreham

SHOREHAM:  FIRST APPEARS IN TIMETABLE OF JUNE, 1900 AS “WARDENCLYFFE.” LOCATED ON WEST SIDE OF NORTH COUNTRY ROAD CROSSING. 
2ND DEPOT BUILT: 1902, ON EAST SIDE OF NORTH COUNTRY ROAD CROSSING, .2 MILES EAST OF FORMER LOCATION. RENAMED “SHOREHAM”: 1906. AGENCY CLOSED: 1935. DEPOT CLOSED WITH LAST REVENUE TRAIN: 10/9/38. OUT OF SVC. PER G.O. #1006C: 3/29/39 AND BRANCH ABANDONED. (Per Vincent Seyfried: used as real estate office and 1950. Per Bob Emery, with photographic proof, building remained abandoned and was repeatedly vandalized for lumber as late as 12/1944. Demolished in 1950.) 

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MP65-66 Emery Map 1925, Shoreham Station 
Collection: Dave Keller
Stone Bridge-Woodville Rd-Shoreham -c.1905.jpg (93084 bytes)
The old stone bridge over Woodville Road just west of the Shoreham station looking north c. 1905. 
This bridge remains in place currently and, along with the relocated Rocky Point depot building, is one of the two remaining structures of any kind along the former Port Jefferson-Wading River extension that was placed out of service on March 29, 1939.  (Photo by A. Greene, Dave Morrison archive)
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Shoreham station  looking NE c. 1905.  This was the "sister" station to the depot building at Auburndale in Queens , minus the porte cochere that the Auburndale structure had.  According to the late LIRR ticket agent Thomas R. Bayles, the Shoreham depot was considered one of the fancier stations on the LIRR, with wicker furniture in the waiting room and wooden shakes on the exterior walls.  Teenage telegraph messenger Bayles would ride his bicycle daily to the station from his home on Rt. 25 in Middle Island and then deliver telegrams via bicycle from the depot into Shoreham village and return, then back home to Middle Island at the end of a long day.  Note the old hand-pulled Long Island Express wagon loaded on the platform, awaiting train time.  Also note the sole Dietz kerosene platform lamp at the foot of the wooden access stairs.  There are three very old automobiles also awaiting train time and in the background behind the station can be seen the rustic wooden entrance to the Shoreham Inn.  (Photo by A. Greene, Ken Brady archive)
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Here's a rear view of Shoreham station c. 1905 looking SE from within the rustic wooden entrance to the Shoreham Inn.  Visible above the depot roof is the upper portion of Nikola Tesla's Wardenclyffe tower.  Wardenclyffe was the original name of Shoreham. (Photo by Greene, Dave Keller archive)
Station-Shoreham-D16b-no.206-Train-WB-View NE-c. 1907 (Greene-Keller).jpg (103463 bytes)
This is yet another terrific image of the Shoreham station as photographed by A. Greene of Port Jefferson.  This view is looking NE c. 1907 and approaching the station is class D16b (4-4-0) #206 with westbound train.  Note the first two extremely old baggage cars.  The agent or his clerk is pulling the loaded Long Island Express wagon, contents of which will be loaded into one of those two lead cars.  (Dave Keller archive)
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This 1912 view of Shoreham station is looking NE and was photographed by Albert Bayles, a LIRR carpenter and amateur photographer.  He was the brother of Thomas R. Bayles mentioned previously.  (Dave Keller archive)
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Albert Bayles took his view the same day as the previous 1912 image.  The camera is looking west with an eastbound class D56 (4-4-0) locomotive and train passing the freight house on the west side of North Country  Road and is in about the same location as the original Wardenclyffe station that first appears on timetables of June, 1900.  This 2nd depot was built in 1902 and the name changed to Shoreham in 1906. In this summer image, we see a couple of girls in their white summer finery heading for the stairs to meet the train.  The rustic wooden entrance to the Shoreham Inn can be seen in the right background, and note that in both 1912 images, a low, white, fence border has been added around the roadway.  (Dave Keller archive)
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Thomas R. Bayles photographed this side view of the Shoreham depot with his little Kodak Brownie box camera in 1914.  We're looking east and the roadway fence border is very visible.  (Dave Keller archive)
Station - Shoreham from Tesla's Wardenclyffe Tower (View NW) - 1914 (T. Bayles-Keller).jpg (50747 bytes)
After all that bicycle riding on a daily basis, Thomas Bayles must've had some stamina as a teenager, because one day in 1914 he climbed the many steps to the top of Nikola Tesla's abandoned Wardenclyffe tower and photographed this birds-eye view of the Shoreham station area.  Visible at the right is the eastbound express house and at the left, the grade crossing of North Country Road .  At the far left, inside the "V" of the tower's wooden timbers, the freight house / westbound express house is visible.  This view is looking northwest.  The rustic wooden entrance to the Shoreham in is in the background as is the little outhouse . . .the toilet facilities for the station and the low, wooden fence border. Not visible in this image are the remains of the curving siding that serviced Tesla's laboratory which was at the foot of the tower and still stands today.  The tower was demolished in 1917.  (Dave Keller archive)
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This is an official Long Island Rail Road valuation image of  Shoreham depot looking due north.  What's great about this photo is that it not only shows the non-ADA handicap access to the tracks and/or depot (only wooden slat stairs!) but it also shows the wooden slatted baggage "slide" down which baggage and express were slid to be caught at the base and loaded onto the express/baggage wagon which appears in earlier photos on this page.  This view is dated as June 26, 1918 and also shows another Dietz kerosene platform lamp at the head of the stairs as well as at their foot. (LIRR - Dave Morrison archive)
Station-Shoreham-View NW - c. 1925 (Osborne-Keller).jpg (90540 bytes)
LIRR block operator James V. Osborne photographed the Shoreham station c. 1925 in this view looking NW.  You'll notice the bushes have grown larger AND . . . the two Dietz kerosene platform lamps have been replace by electric lights on platform poles.  Also gone is the rustic wooden entrance to the Shoreham Inn.  (Dave Keller archive)
Station-Shoreham-Abandoned-View NW-c. 1938 (SUNY-Emery-Keller).jpg (92069 bytes)
Compare this sad image with the previous one as well as with the similar angle view from 1912 with eastbound train.  This is the end for the once-fine Shoreham depot.  This view, looking west, is not dated, but as it appears to have been shot from the rear of an eastbound train, and judging by the ramshackle condition of the structures and the overgrown grounds, it must've been photographed close to the end of scheduled revenue train service which occurred in October, 1938.  The fact that the rails are very shiny indicate that daily train service is still in force, although minimal service at that.  Note the distant freight house no longer stands and the platform electric lights and poles have been removed.  The extension between Port Jefferson and Wading River , along which Shoreham was a station stop, was officially abandoned by general order effective March 29, 1939 and the tracks were torn up shortly thereafter.  (Robert Emery collection: SUNY at Stony Brook)
Station-Shoreham-Vandalized for Lumber-View SE - 12-19-44 (SUNY-Emery-Keller).jpg (82393 bytes)
Even sadder than the previous image is this view looking SE on December 19, 1944.  While the Shoreham station was taken out of service and the branch abandoned in March, 1939, it appears the old depot building stood for a number of years afterward.  Vincent Seyfried in his LIRR history states the building was used by a realty company, but that was probably only for a few years after the 1939 abandonment, because one can clearly see that the structure had been heavily vandalized as a second-hand lumber source for quite some time for it to be in this poor a condition by the end of 1944, only 5 ½ years later.   What's even more amazing, is that it wasn't completely demolished until 1950 . . . another 5 years later!  (Robert Emery collection:  SUNY at Stony Brook)
Station-Shoreham-Former Sta Location & ROW-View E - 1969 (Keller-Keller).jpg (161602 bytes)
Fast-forward to the winter of 1969 and this image was photographed looking east along the LIRR's former right-of-way towards the former location of the Shoreham depot, which was approximately between the two power poles at the left.  The original cut below grade is still evident at the time of this photo.  (Dave Keller photo and archive) 

Wading River

Dave Morrison holding the Wading River Station to be restored by Carl Dimino and returned to the Wading River Historical Society. Photo: Dave Morrison 5/09/2014

WADING RIVER: BUILT: 1895, REMODELED TO TWO STOREY: 1906. AGENT AND FAMILY LIVED UPSTAIRS. AGENCY CLOSED: c. 1933. TRACKS CUT BACK AND STATION FACILITIES RELOCATED 1 MILE WEST OF FORMER LOCATION TO RANDALL ROAD: 1/18/38 (MILLER FAMILY RECLAIMED THEIR PROPERTY FROM RIVERHEAD TOWN LINE EAST TO ORIGINAL END OF TRACK). WOODEN DEPOT RAZED SOMETIME AFTER AND LUMBER USED TO BUILD STORE NORTH OF STATION SITE. LAST REVENUE TRAIN: 10/9/38. RELOCATED STATION OUT OF SVC. PER G.O. #1006C: 3/29/39 AND BRANCH ABANDONED.

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MP68 Emery Map 1925, Collection: Dave Keller

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Wading River winter 1912

A rare image this is. The upstairs has recently been added so the agent and his family could live on site. There are his two kids in the foreground: the boy in the sleigh wearing no hat and freezing his ears off and the little girl, well-bundled up and walking along the freshly-shoveled wooden platform.

In the background it appears that the agent is sweeping off the remainder of the platform and some LIRR men are clearing snow from around the switch which allowed the engine to be cut off and run around the train at end-of-track. You can see the switch target to the right of the single guy at the right . . . it towers over him as does the lone, Dietez kerosene platform lamp towering over the sweeping agent. Collection: Dave Keller

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Wading River 1907, In red it says "George Schultz" and dimensions 
are 50' x 100' Collection: Art Huneke

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Wading River Station -  Experimental Greenery c.1898

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Engine house, coaling bunker and water tank at Wading River
 terminal  June, 1918. View looking southeast. 
Archive: Dave Keller

 

 

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Wading River 1918 View E.

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Depot building looking northeast  9/06/1937 
(Votava- Keller)
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G5s #29 Last revenue train on Wading River Extension
 preparing to leave Wading River 10/09/1938
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End of Track of Wading River Extension 1968 (Keller-Keller)

The Wading River terminal had a wye, located north of the tracks to turn engines around. It also had a wooden, two-stall engine house south of the tracks along with coaling and watering facilities.

The LIRR’s main track ended on the west side of Wading River-Manor Road, with the depot building on the north side of the tracks. However, a siding used to service a coal supplier branched south off the main and extended further east across Wading River-Manor Road a distance. So . . . . while the LIRR’s end-of-track was technically on the west side of Wading River-Manor Road, it really extended further, via the siding.

As business got really slow, the railroad stopped running actual trains out to Wading River, but ran a shuttle service between Port Jefferson and Wading River utilizing a self-propelled gas car, nicknamed a “doodlebug.” This car ran on gasoline and carried passengers as well as baggage and could operate with only a motorman and a conductor. Quite a bit of savings from a steam locomotive and tender using lots of coal and water had having a full crew of engineer, fireman, conductor, trainman and brakeman.

An interesting point to note is that in January, 1938, the end-of-track was cut back one mile west with a low-level platform constructed for use as the new station as the description above for Wading River station mentions.

Per official LIRR General Orders, the following information may be of interest to you as it spells out the final days of service:

GENERAL ORDER #811C, EFFECTIVE 1/18/38:

WADING RIVER STATION AND STATION FACILITIES RELOCATED 1 MILE 
WEST OF FORMER LOCATION.

GENERAL ORDER #1006C, EFFECTIVE 3/29/39:

SINGLE TRACK FROM A POINT 1,550’ EAST OF EAST LEG OF WYE, PORT
JEFFERSON STATION TO WADING RIVER STATION OUT OF SERVICE.
(Last revenue train was on 10/9/38. DK)

MILLER PLACE STATION AND STATION FACILITIES OUT OF SERVICE
ROCKY POINT STATION AND STATION FACILITIES OUT OF SERVICE
SHOREHAM STATION AND STATION FACILITIES OUT OF SERVICE
WADING RIVER STATION AND STATION FACILITIES OUT OF SERVICE
PO (Port Jefferson) UNATTENDED BLOCK STATION OUT OF SERVICE
MI (Miller Place) UNATTENDED BLOCK STATION OUT OF SERVICE
WY (Wading River) UNATTENDED BLOCK STATION OUT OF SERVICE
JF (Port Jefferson) EASTWARD BLOCK SIGNAL OUT OF SERVICE

WESTWARD LOWER QUADRANT SEMAPHORE DISTANT SIGNAL LOCATED 
EAST OF PORT JEFFERSON STATION OUT OF SERVICE

The right-of-way was acquired by Long Island Lighting Company (LILCO) to run their power lines. The right-of-way is now used by LIPA, the successor to LILCO. 

The late Robert Emery, railfan and LIRR Conductor walked the remains of the right-of-way in October of 1957 and provided the following data regarding mileposts:

Location of mileposts in relation to Route 25A, all located on north side, as of 10/1957:

MP 58 300’ east of Columbia Street - Port Jefferson 
MP 59 On embankment 400’ west of Gulf gas station - Mt. Sinai (still in)
MP 60 Back of Miller Machine Tool factory – Miller Place
MP 61 100’ east of Miller Place Road – Miller Place (still in)
MP 62 North on Harrison Ave. where it crossed the LIRR tracks – Sound Beach
MP 63 About 400’ north of the point where LILCO high tension feeder line to RCA crosses Route 25A – Rocky Point
MP 64 500’ north of Rocky Point School – Rocky Point (still in)
MP 65 300’ east of Harding Street – Rocky Point (still in)
MP 66 Approx. ___’ north of Miller Ave. on ROW – Shoreham (still in)
MP 67 400’ west of “Nike” Air Base Road – Wading River (still in)
MP 68 Approx. 300’ north of hollow on Route 25A which is 1,000’ west of Riverhead Town Line – Wading River

The stone overpass at Woodville Road in Shoreham is the last of the right-of-way structures that is still intact. The wooden trestle over the tracks at Miller’s Place was dismantled in 1939. The stone overpass at Rocky Point was demolished around the same time and the reddish-brown stones were shipped up the road and used as a retaining wall at Cedar Beach. 

The depot building at Rocky Point is still standing, having been moved slightly south of the original right-of-way and onto private property and has been incorporated into the structures on their grounds. As far as I know it is still standing. 
  Dave Keller 11/2006  (updated:  02/25/17)