LINKS 


LIRR Proto Info

 
Jay Tower 6/1951 LIRR

Car Load Modeling Estimates 07/25/10
Modeling Moving Freight  01/26/05 by Jon Cure
Waybills 10/05/07
Modeling Air Brake Inspection 02/09/07
LIRR Decal Info  07/23/06
MP-75 Pass Car Info 06/29/06
Caboose Colors
05/11/05
Pass Paint Schemes 05/11/05
Patchogue Crew Messages 02/06/05
E. Williston Station 01/18/05
LIRR Colors 11/25/04
LIRR 1950 Car Loads Chart
1969 % Freight Cars In Use
Modeling Car Types 1992
LIRR MOW Gondola
Newspaper Rolls 12/13/04
MU "54" Series Car Info 11/06/03
Modeling LIRR Tugs 11/09/03
Patchogue Car Types
Patchogue Industries
11/11/03

Brooklyn/Queens Industry
LIRR Freight Yards
CR4 - 1903
1959 Telephone Listings
Modeling Short Trains

Caboose Servicing
RDC Info
Weathering Q-Tips
Athearn SEICO Boxcar
FMC Itel Boxcar
55 Gal. Drum Color Info
Telephone Poles Info
Painting People
Mixing Dirt Paint

Embedded Tracks
Decal Printing Tip
Misc. RR Dates
HO Car Weight
Scenery Tricks & Tips
Humorous Industry Names
Storage Label Tip
Airbrush Troubleshoot 11/22/04

Model Railroading Main Page

Here you will find links to LIRR and other rail line modeling via prototype and model photos, maps, charts and other related info for your railroading and modeling enjoyment.


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    What's New Last Updated: 12/03/2016

Proto-Modeling Info 8/05/09
Art Single's LIRR model 12/01/16
A First Proto Scratch Build - GN Boxcar 12/04/15

Mike Boland Walther's Interlocking Tower 12/5/2012
Richard Glueck's 1/12th Scale LIRR N52A  #43   7/31/11
LIRR Diamond Crossing Sign 07/01/11
LIRR LIST "Semaphore" MODELER ARTICLES by Mike Boland  1/09/10
LIRR NX23A Hacks  7/05/09
LIRR Caboose #14 Restoration from The Keystone Vol. 37 No.1-2 Spring 2004 7/08/08
PRR Brunswick Green
  from The Keystone Vol. 38 No.1  6/23/08 
 

 

A First Proto Scratch Build - GN Boxcar

GN-bigskyblue_DH-Oneonta_3-72.jpg (60564 bytes)
GN  #12506 Boxcar plug/sliding door "Big Sky Blue" Oneonta, NY 3/1972
Photo: Steven Lynch

It's an early Spring day in late March 1972 at the Delaware & Hudson Railroad main classification yard in Oneonta, NY.  Housed here where the engine shops/repair/rebuild facilities, a 180 roundhouse, major classification yard, etc. in days gone by. 

The yard at this time is in serious decay as many RIP tracks are full, the roundhouse is abandoned, and very few employees/activities are in evidence.

This car, spotted further east of the main yard, was still in active revenue service and I found it intriguing; thus my first freight car photo. 

GN13239_double-door_plug-sliding_Klamath-Falls-OR_8-29-1974_RonHawkins.jpg (48260 bytes)
GN #13239 Double door - plug/sliding Klamath Falls, OR 8/2//1974 
Photo: Ron Hawkins

Modeling this car began with an extended eBay/online search for a undecorated 50' plug/sliding door box. Having finally found one; the following was added:

1. Kadee couplers
2. MU hoses
3. Coupler lift bars
4. Brass roof walk
5. Metal trucks
6. New Ladders and stirrups
7. Sprayed for "Big Sky Blue"
8. Various decal sets applied: ACF data, safety stripes, herald, data, end numbers, etc. (19 separate pieces per side)
9. Light weathering
10. Dull coat sealed

GN12003.jpg (224674 bytes)
GN #12003

LIRR Modeling LIRR Model Railroads 

lirr206_C420waltersFA-2_RGlueck.jpg (106870 bytes)
LIRR #206 C420 Walters FA-2 
Models/Photo: Richard Glueck
 

Jim Caramore's  LIRR - LI City to Morris Park

Art Single's  LIRR Railroad 


Glen Johnson's  LIRR - North Fork 


Chart/Research June 2007:  Walter Wohleking published in Modeling Mineola 

 Walther's PRR/LIRR Interlocking Tower by Mike Boland


LIRR MODELER ARTICLES by Mike Boland

DUNTON-Tower_sthurmovik 03-30-2000.jpg (125518 bytes)
DUNTON Tower Photo: S. Thurmovik 03/30/2000

Richard Glueck's 1.5" to the foot, or 1/8th scale. LIRR N52A  #43lirr43_052911.jpg (104642 bytes)

lirr43_052911yardlimitrichglueck.jpg (146133 bytes)

The BAR reefer weighs in at about 70 lbs.  The CNR boxcar is filled with bricks, so it now weighs about 80- 90 lbs.  The LIRR caboose is light, and weighs about 30 pounds.  My locomotive weighs about 400 lbs. when loaded with water and coal; light it weighs about 300 lbs. R. Glueck
diamondXAl CastelliWantaghHistoricalSociety.jpg (79191 bytes)
LIRR Diamond Crossing Sign - Wantagh Historical Society Photo: Al Castelli

LIRR FA #614 06/18/2008 Text and Photos:  Richard Glueck 
 
10.jpg (292201 bytes)


LIRR NX23A Hacks
07/05/09


PRR Brunswick Green  06/23/08
from The Keystone Vol. 38 No.1


PRR/LIRR Whistle Post and Ring Sign Specs 1927 04/26/05


LIRR C-Liner Coupler Upgrade
06/18/08 Text and Photos:  Pat Scopelliti

Modeling Mineola 06/01/07
LIRR Mineola Site

LDERoslynNY.jpg (381065 bytes)
Roslyn Layout Design Element (LDE) appeared in Model RR Planning 2004

ENGINES, ROLLING STOCK, MOW, SCENES, ETC.

LIRR Modeling Articles 05/30/08

Modeling the Long Island's Cannon Ball Article by: Doug Nelson - MR October 2006
LIRR Interlocking Tower- Locust Valley Article by: Andrew Victors - MR April 1999
South Farmingdale Shelter by: Guy Martin & James Van Tassell, MR April, 1963
Scratch building the Jamaica Depot Article by: Jerry Strangarity RMC Dec 1993
LIRR Alco-GE 100 ton Boxcab Switcher #401 Article by: Tom Busack MR Sept 1981
LIRR RS1 Article by: Frank Cicero RMC Mar 1997
LIRR SW1001 Article by: Frank Cicero RMC May 1996 sw1001_cover.jpg (222671 bytes)

 

 


LIRR GP38-2 Article by: Frank Cicero RMC Feb 1994
LIRR Gondola 2751 Semaphore April 1993
LIRR Caboose #14 Restoration
The Keystone Vol. 38 No.1-2

Fm2001-Z-Scale-JohnBartolotto.jpg (125684 bytes)
FM #2001 Z scale 
Photo: John Bartolotto

C420-212-Zscale-JohnBartolotto.jpg (66709 bytes)
C420 #212 Z scale 
Photo: John Bartolotto

AJIN Precision Mfg C420.jpg (16319 bytes) 
LIRR C420 #200

lirr211detail.jpg (119817 bytes)
Note how the the gray goes about 5" or more in front of the notch of the radiator well.  What it's not showing is how it arced across the top, but it wasn't squared off.  
Info/photo: John Scala

LIRR Diesel Engine Units 05/30/08

gqr.gif (15708 bytes)The correct typeface for LIRR graphic elements such a station signage and rolling stock lettering is Helvetica Bold, or Helvetica 75 Bold, or Helvetica Neue Bold (they're all basically the same; even the most finicky of graphic designers probably couldn't tell which is which just by looking at them).

That's the official standard. Out in the real world, it's not that neat. For example, the M7s appear to use something heavier than 75 but lighter than 95 (Black). 
Info: Jim aka Erie-Lackawanna

lirr154lettering.jpg (118018 bytes)lirrlettering.jpg (84043 bytes)


LIRR 0-6-0 Class B51-53b
LIRR Steam Engines 06/18/08

SUNSET BRASS N-5.jpg (22708 bytes)
LIRR N5 Caboose #1
LIRR Caboose' 05/30/08

W80.jpg (36525 bytes)
LIRR "fantasy" MOW Russell Plow 
LIRR Modeling MOW 08/18/08

LIRR Modeling Pass/Mail/Baggage Cars 06/22/08
sw1001_100_honeywell_st_lic_5-21-77HenryWagner.jpg (80636 bytes)
LIRR C-56 Roof Detail   Photo: Henry Wagner

LIRR Freight Modeling
06/24/08

LIRR Lionel Cars
07/17/2008

Proto - Modeling Info

LIRR-feederwires-072509-Greenport-AlCastelli.jpg (110649 bytes)
Track Feeder Wires
LIRR Track wiring 07/25/09 Greenport Photo: Al Castelli

LIRR-L419-030972-RichmondHill-RobertBDunnet-trackcr.jpg (30763 bytes)
 Transition Rail joiner
LIRR 03/09/1972 Richmond Hill 
Photo: Robert B. Dunnet 

ROW - Roadbed  by David S. Rose  
ballast.jpg (116980 bytes)Think about the engineering challenge faced by running miles of narrow ribbons of steel track on top of the ground: they are subject to heat expansion and contraction, ground movement and vibration, precipitation buildup from rough weather, and weed and plant growth from underneath. Now keep in mind that while 99% of the time they are just sitting there unburdened, the remaining 1% they are subject to moving loads as heavy as 1,000,000 pounds (the weight of a Union Pacific Big Boy locomotive and its tender).

Put all this together, and you have yourself a really, really interesting problem that was first solved nearly 200 years ago, and hasn't been significantly improved since!

The crushed stones are what is known as ballast. Their purpose is to hold the wooden cross ties in place, which in turn hold the rails in place.



ballast profile.jpg (25744 bytes)The answer is to start with the bare ground, and then build up a foundation to raise the track high enough so it won't get flooded. On top of the foundation, you deposit a load of crushed stone (the ballast). On top of the stone, you lay down (perpendicular to the direction of the track) a line of wooden beams on 19.5 inch centers, 8 1/2 feet long, 9 inches wide and 7 inches thick, weighing about 200 pounds...3,249 of them per mile. You then continue to dump crushed stone all around the beams. The sharp edges of the stone make it difficult for them to slide over each other (in the way that smooth, round pebbles would), thus effectively locking them in place.

Think about the engineering challenge faced by running miles of narrow ribbons of steel track on top of the ground: they are subject to heat expansion and contraction, ground movement and vibration, precipitation buildup from rough weather, and weed and plant growth from underneath. Now keep in mind that while 99% of the time they are just sitting there unburdened, the remaining 1% they are subject to moving loads as heavy as 1,000,000 pounds (the weight of a Union Pacific Big Boy locomotive and its tender).

Put all this together, and you have yourself a really, really interesting problem that was first solved nearly 200 years ago, and hasn't been significantly improved since!

The answer is to start with the bare ground, and then build up a foundation to raise the track high enough so it won't get flooded. On top of the foundation, you deposit a load of crushed stone (the ballast). On top of the stone, you lay down (perpendicular to the direction of the track) a line of wooden beams on 19.5 inch centers, 8 1/2 feet long, 9 inches wide and 7 inches thick, weighing about 200 pounds...3,249 of them per mile. You then continue to dump crushed stone all around the beams. The sharp edges of the stone make it difficult for them to slide over each other (in the way that smooth, round pebbles would), thus effectively locking them in place. 

Note: There are approximately 689,974,000 ties in the United States, supporting 212,000 miles of railroad track. In 2011 the major US railroads replaced a total of 15,063,539 ties. 14,148,012 of them were new and made of wood; 544,652 were second-hand wood ties; and 370,875 were new ties made of something other than wood. Old ties are recycled for use in landscaping, turned into pellet fuel, or burned in co-generation plants to provide electricity.

tie bar 2.jpg (93511 bytes)Next, you bring in hot-rolled steel rails, historically 39' long in the US (because they were carried to the site in 40' gondola cars), but increasingly now 78', and lay them on top of the ties, end to end. They used to be joined by bolting on an extra piece of steel (called a "fishplate") across the side of the joint, but today are usually continuously welded end-to-end.

tie plate.jpg (62461 bytes)It would seem that you could just nail them or bolt them down to the ties, but that won't work. The non-trivial movement caused by heat expansion and contraction along the length of the rail would cause it to break or buckle if any of it were fixed in place. So instead, the rails are attached to the sleepers by clips or anchors, which hold them down but allow them to move longitudinally as they expand or contract.
So there you have it: a centuries old process that is extremely effective at facilitating the movement of people and material over thousands of miles...even though nothing is permanently attached to the ground with a fixed connection!

The ballast distributes the load of the ties (which in turn bear the load of the train on the track, held by clips) across the foundation, allows for ground movement, thermal expansion and weight variance, allow rain and snow to drain through the track, and inhibit the growth of weeds and vegetation that would quickly take over the track.

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